Redistribution

Redistribution

Pope Francis calls for “Legitimate Redistribution” of Wealth.  

Going beyond the article, I think this should be an individual’s moral issue.  Like in the Baristas’ presentation the owner’s argue that they can only afford to pay minimal salaries because the market is not sophisticated enough to understand that they should pay more for “ethically obtained coffee beans.”  The owners are already making profits and so the question is “how much is enough?”  Is there ever a point at which they acknowledge they could pay more to baristas?  Let’s say the Milwaukee market suddenly becomes able to pay double per serving of coffee, that is a 100% increase.  Will any part of this increase be transferred as increased salary to baristas?  My answer is No, the owner will pocket the extra income and will pass nothing to the workers.  Actually the workers -baristas, are making him rich.  Wealth is generated by the work of humans.  Not by capital alone.  I AM NOT SAYING that the owners of capital should not receive the profits generated by their capital.  The questions remains “Is there a point at which a capital owner pays more -redistributes, to the people that make him/her the money?”  This cannot be legislated.  This cannot be ordered by the Pope.  This is an individual’s question.

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Food mobile

Food mobile

“Ratusan Juta Rupiah Hanya Dari Buah dan Sayuran”  It is done in Indonesia.  Google translate detected Malayan, and the translation was “Hundreds of million dollar only from food and vegetables.”  Apparently is done for profit.

Initial Interview

The initial interview took place at Glorioso’s Italian Market, a family-owned business on Brady Street in Milwaukee.  Since this meeting was scheduled on a Sunday afternoon, the market was buzzing with activity–shoppers of all ages stopping in to purchase goods.  Ted Glorioso (the owner) was handing out chocolate covered strawberries to the ladies in the dining area and cake to the gentlemen in the dining area.  The initial contact and her husband had just finished a Milwaukee Food tour prior to our meeting.  They both were extremely nice and polite, and clearly passionate about food in Milwaukee.  As entrepreneurs, making a living through their passions for food and Milwaukee, it was evident they assumed roles as ‘food experts’ in the community.  During this initial meeting, the research question had not yet been identified, thus the conversation revolved around answer the following question–“what might be worth researching about food in Milwaukee.” Several topics emerged such as: (a) Why are some of the oldest Milwaukee restaurants closing?; (b) Is there a such thing as “too authentic” in Milwaukee?; What is going on with regard to the ethnic traditions and restaurants in Milwaukee?’ (d) What comprises the foodie culture?; (e) Are the younger generations going to the franchise or locally owned restaurants?; and (f) What, if anything, is different about the food scene in Milwaukee for city-dwellers and suburbanites? From there, my initial contact put me in touch with another prominent food name in Milwaukee–Lori Fredrich.